Can a DUI Affect Your Job in Arizona?

Having an Arizona DUI on your record could have severe impacts on your career. Many organizations that issue licenses or certifications won’t do so if you don’t follow strict ethics and behavior rules.

A DUI conviction could mean suspension or revocation of such certifications or professional licenses, meaning your career is ruined with one judgment error.

Arizona law governs many professions and who can make a career within those professions. We’ll examine some of these circumstances and showcase why you must hire a good lawyer if you’re facing an Arizona DUI charge.

Health care professionals

Health care professionals often hold the lives of others in their hands. One error in judgment could mean that another person suffers pain or further ailment.

Licensed health care providers in Arizona need to notify the licensing board of a DUI arrest within 10 days. The review board can place the individual on probation for as long as five years. And, the board could require that you go through alcohol abuse training and undergo random tests to check for your sobriety at work.

Nurses also need to notify their review board of DUI charges within 10 days of arrest. Based on your blood-alcohol content (BAC) at the time of your arrest, the review board will decide your punishment. If you’re officially convicted of a DUI, the board could revoke your license to be a nurse in Arizona.

Military careers

The military also takes DUI charges very seriously. You could be dishonorably discharged or prevented from enlisting in the military if you have a DUI on your record.

The best option for military professionals is to work with an Arizona DUI attorney to decrease the charges to reckless driving or have them dropped entirely. You won’t be able to join the military if you’re on probation, but a reckless driving charge does not prohibit you from the military permanently.

CDL drivers

Drivers that hold a commercial license and operate large vehicles for their profession will likely be unable to continue their career as normal. Commercially licensed drivers operate large vehicles and generally have much stricter rules for their blood alcohol content than regular drivers.

Even if you weren’t driving professionally at the time of your DUI, you’re likely to face losing your career if you’re convicted of a DUI. For certain, your license will be suspended for a year when convicted of a DUI, which means you won’t be able to continue your job for at least that duration.

However, your commercial license could be suspended for longer than that year depending on the circumstances surrounding your DUI conviction.

What DUI data do I have to report to a licensing board?

Every licensing board is different, but for the most part, a blood alcohol content of .08 or higher is a serious offense in Arizona. So if you’re convicted of such a charge, you’ll need to contact your review board for more information.

For the most part, DUI charges are not the big concern when evaluating your career. It’s when those charges become a formal conviction on your permanent record that you could have some problems. Outstanding charges could make it challenging to pursue a new job, but it shouldn’t have a huge bearing on your existing job until you face your day in court.

Building a DUI defense to save your career

No DUI charge automatically means you’ll be convicted. Take a deep breath and contact a lawyer as soon as possible. Some defense strategies that your attorney might recommend include the following.

  • The arresting officer did not have probable cause for the traffic stop
  • The officer failed to inform you of your Miranda rights
  • The field sobriety test was not executed properly
  • The breathalyzer was not calibrated properly at the time of administering the test
  • The blood draw is invalid due to how the specimen was handled and could have been contaminated

If you’re facing a DUI charge in Arizona and have a career you enjoy, you should contact our office immediately. We’ll prepare a legal defense for you and do all we can to protect your good name and your profession.